Parasites

External Parasites

Fleas

Parasites are “freeloaders” that live in or on another creature. Fleas are the most common external parasite found on dogs (and cats). Although fleas are more likely to be a problem during warm-weather months, they can also cause problems during cooler seasons due to their ability to continue their life cycle indoors. Read more

Ticks

Ectoparasites are organisms that live on the outside of an animal. Ticks are fairly common ectoparasites of dogs (and cats). How often you see ticks on your dog and how severe a tick assault will be depends on the region of the country in which you live, the time of year (tick activity varies in warm and cool weather), the habits of your dog, and how and when you use tick control products. Some ticks can infest dogs that spend most of their time indoors, and even dogs that only spend brief periods of time outside can have ticks. Read more

Mites & Mange

Demodex is a parasitic mite that causes a skin disease often referred to as mange or canine demodicosis. The microscopic Demodex mites live in the hair follicles and oil glands of your dog’s (or cat’s) skin or at the skin surface. Read more

Ear mites are tiny mites, barely visible to the human eye, that live on the surface of ear canal skin in dogs (and cats). They are barely visible to the human eye.  An infestation produces brownish ear wax, similar in appearance to coffee grounds.  Ear mites are contagious and can travel from the ears of an infected dog to any other dogs in close contact. Read more

Lice

Lice are parasites that live on the skin of an affected dog. They are actually a small insect that feeds by chewing on the skin of the dog or by sucking the blood, depending on the type of louse. Left unchecked, they can grow to be an infestation on the dog’s body. Dog lice are not as common as dog fleas, and are most often seen in situations where sanitary practices are poor. Read more

 

Internal Parasites

Roundworms

Roundworms are the most common of the parasitic worms found inside a dog. Almost all dogs become infected with them at some time in their lives, usually as puppies. Roundworms may be contracted in different ways, making them easy to spread and hard to control. Read more

Tapeworms

Tapeworms are long, flat worms that attach themselves to your dog’s (or cat’s) intestines. A tapeworm body consists of multiple parts, or segments, each with its own reproductive organs. Tapeworm infections are usually diagnosed by finding segments—which appear as small white worms that may look like grains of rice or seeds—on the rear end of your dog, in your dog’s feces, or where your dog lives and sleeps. Read more

Hookworms

Similar to tapeworms and roundworms, hookworms are intestinal parasites that live in the digestive system of your dog (or cat). The hookworm attaches to the lining of the intestinal wall and feeds on your dog’s blood. Its eggs are ejected into the digestive tract and pass into the environment through your dog’s feces. Read more

Heartworms

Heartworms are common in dogs throughout the United States (cats can have them, too). They are among the most damaging parasites in dogs but they are almost100 percent preventable. Heartworms are transmitted by mosquitoes and, once mature, they live in the heart and large blood vessels of the lungs. Adult heartworms can measure over one foot in length. Read more

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